Interview: San Francisco Review of Books

I recently discussed several issues relating to secularism with Joseph Ford Cotto of the San Francisco Review of Books. The first installment of the exchange is at this link.

March for Science is April 22

With the success of the Women’s March on Washington last month, another idea for rallying has gained traction — a March for Science. In today’s post-truth America, the denial and misuse of science is widespread, and the March for Science is an attempt to push back. Here’s my latest Psychology Today piece, discussing the issue in more detail.

New event: Boston, January 25

I’ll be at Boston University on Wednesday night, January 25, at 7:30, discussing the topic, “The Danger of Claiming Rights Come from God.” The event is hosted by the Disproof Atheism Society and will be held in room 442 of the Photonics Center. More details here.

 

New event: Providence, Rhode Island, January 9

I will be in Providence, Rhode Island, on Monday night, January 9, at an event sponsored by the Humanists Of Rhode Island, speaking on the topic of “Humanism in Trump’s America.” The event takes place at the Rochambeau Library, 708 Hope Street, with a start time of 7 p.m. More details here. If you’re in the area, please stop by and say hello!

 

School Uses Donuts to Lure Kids to Bible Study

Our American Humanist Association legal center sent a complaint to a Missouri school district today complaining that faculty members are using free donuts to lure kids into Bible study. Coverage from the Springfield News-Leader here.

AHA Back in Court: Fourth Circuit Appeal

Our American Humanist Association legal center was back in court yesterday, this time in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing for removal of a 40-foot Christian cross from a traffic median in Bladensburg, Maryland. Coverage from the Washington Post here.

Corporate Power and the Demise of Democracy

My latest Psychology Today article looks at the powerlessness of average citizens in 2016 and the frustration and anger that flow from it. After all, it was just such powerlessness that ultimately produced the voter backlash that led to Donald Trump’s election.

So why are ordinary people so powerless? It’s because institutional interests control the apparatus of government, thus resulting in the demise of American democracy. You want eternal vigilance? Go take a look at how corporations pursue their interests.  Full article here.

The Danger of Claiming that Rights Come from God

My latest Psychology Today article explores the claim, so often heard from those promoting God-language in the public arena, that our rights come from God and can’t be taken away by the government. Such grandiose claims may have an appeal, but they can’t stand up to scrutiny. Full article here.

Conference: CFI of Northeast Ohio, September 17

I’ll be speaking at the conference of CFI of Northeast Ohio on September 17. The theme of the conference is Humanist Voices: Secular Solutions for a Troubled World. The conference will be held at the Crowne Plaza Cleveland South, 5300 Rockside Road, Independence, Ohio. More details at this link.

Felony Disenfranchisement Is a Humanist Issue

In the wide array of issues out there, felony disenfranchisement doesn’t rank very high on anyone’s list of priorities. Many states have laws that prohibit convicted felons from voting, sometimes even for life, and the outcry of protest is not very loud. But it should be.

As I explain in my latest Psychology Today piece, felony disenfranchisement raises questions relating not only to the universality of voting, but to longstanding issues of race and class as well. Voting is a basic right in a democracy, and the imperfect criminal justice system shouldn’t be deciding who can cast a vote. Those who have paid their dues to society should get to participate in the democratic process. For humanists and others who claim progressive values, it’s an important social justice issue.   Full story here.